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A Super Stretchy, Self-Healing Material Could Lead to Artificial Muscle
Our work on stretchable, self-healing materials was featured on Stanford News.


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New Stanford battery shuts down at high temperatures and restarts when it cools
Our work on smart batteries was featured prominently around the Internet.


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A Record-setting Way to Make Transparent Conductors: Spread Them Like Butter on Toast
Our work on transparent conductors was featured on the Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory News.


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Stanford engineers create artificial skin that can send pressure sensation to brain cell
Our work on pressure-sensitive E-skin was featured prominently through the Internet.


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E-Skin That Changes Color Like a Chameleon
Our work on pressure-sensitive, color-changing E-skin was featured on the Daily Beast.


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Stretchable Carbon Nanotube Transistors Are Put to the Test
Our work on robust carbon nanotube devices was featured on the MRS Bulletin.


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Microscopic Rake Doubles Efficiency of Low-cost Solar Cells
Our work on fluid-enhanced solution shearing for solar cells was featured by the Stanford National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC).


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Carbon-60 and graphene for vertical transistors
Our work on C60 and graphene for vertical transistors was featured on nanotechweb.org.


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New "designer carbon" from Stanford boosts battery performance
Our work on designer carbon for batteries was featured on the Stanford Report.


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Engineers Make World’s Fastest Organic Transistor
Our work on transparent organic transistors was featured on Stanford Engineering News and Materials Today.


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Welcome to Bao Research Group

A book on Organic Field Effect Transistors

R

esearch areas in the Bao Group include synthesis of functional organic and polymer materials, organic electronic device design and fabrication, and applications development for organic electronics. Our approach is multidisciplinary, involving concepts and expertise from chemistry, chemical engineering, biomedical engineering, materials science and engineering, physics, and electrical engineering. The devices of current interest are organic and carbon nanotube thin film transistors, organic photovoltaic cells, chemical/biological sensors and molecular switches. These devices are used as characterization tools for fundamental charge transport and photophysics studies. They are also of practical interest for nano-scale electronics, alternative energy sources, low cost and large area flexible plastic circuits, displays, and disposable sensors.

News Feature: Stanford Researchers Create Artificial Skin That Senses Touch - ABC


See our recent work on fast and reversible thermoresponsive polymer switching materials for safer batteries.

Radio Feature: Just Like Human Skin, This Plastic Sheet Can Sense And Heal - NPR's All Tech Considered

News Feature: Electronic Skin May Someday Restore Touch - ABC


See our recent review on The Evolution of Electronic Skin (E-Skin): A Brief History, Design Considerations, and Recent Progress.

Learn about how our wireless pressure sensor works:

Learn about our self-healing plastics:

 

 

Group Announcements

  • Yingli Rao wins the SPC Members' Choice Poster Award

     

     

     

     


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  • Professor Bao elected to the National Academy of Engineering

     

     

     

     


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  • Professor Bao featured as one of Nature's 10

     

     

     

     


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  • Professor Bao named 1 of the 13 Most Impressive Professors at Stanford University

     

     

     


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  • Clementine Boutry wins Best Student Paper at the IEEE SENSORS 2015 Conference

     

     


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  • Sean Andrews wins Best Poster at Oak Ridge National Lab

     


     


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  • Gino wins the CHESS Student Paper Prize for his work published in Nature Communications



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  • Amanda Nguyen receives the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship





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  • Ben Naab receives an award from the ACS Division of Polymer Chemistry

     


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