Semiconductors that stretch and heal

Featured on Nature News and many more

Polymeric semiconductors have been prepared whose molecular properties make them stretchable and healable — a milestone in the development of sophisticated organic electronic surfaces that mimic human skin.

 

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How to Give Fake Hands Real Feeling

Featured on MIT Technology Review

In Zhenan Bao’s lab at Stanford, researchers are ­inventing materials for touch-sensitive prosthetics.

 

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A Super Stretchy, Self-Healing Material Could Lead to Artificial Muscle

Featured on Stanford News

Researchers create a polymer that can stretch to 100 times its original length — and even repair itself if punctured.

 

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New Stanford battery shuts down at high temperatures and restarts when it cools

Featured on Stanford News and many others

New Stanford battery shuts down at high temperatures and restarts when it cools

 

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A Record-setting Way to Make Transparent Conductors: Spread Them Like Butter on Toast

Featured on the Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory News

Stanford, SLAC Process Has Potential for Scaling Up to Manufacture Solar Cells, Displays and More.

 

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Stanford engineers create artificial skin that can send pressure sensation to brain cell

Featured on Stanford News and many others

Stanford engineers have created a plastic skin-like material that can detect pressure and deliver a Morse code-like signal directly to a living brain cell. The work takes a big step toward adding a sense of touch to prosthetic limbs.

 

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E-Skin That Changes Color Like a Chameleon

Featured on the Daily Beast

Researchers at Stanford have created electronic skin that not only functions like human skin, but can change color.

 

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Stretchable Carbon Nanotube Transistors Are Put to the Test

Featured on the MRS Bulletin

Alex Chortos and colleagues from Zhenan Bao's group at Stanford University and Samsung Electronics are setting the bar for mechanical robustness

 

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Microscopic Rake Doubles Efficiency of Low-cost Solar Cells

Featured on the Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory News

Researchers from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have developed a manufacturing technique that could double the electricity output of inexpensive solar cells by using a microscopic rake when applying light-harvesting polymers.

 

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Carbon-60 and graphene for vertical transistors

Featured on nanotechweb.org

Researchers at the University of Stanford in the US, the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) in South Korea and Queen’s University Belfast in the UK have grown carbon-60 thin films on graphene (a sheet of carbon just one atom thick). They then made the resulting structures up into vertical transistors doped with n-type semiconducting materials and found that these devices have current on/off ratios of more than 3 x 103. The results prove that graphene is an excellent substrate for assembling small organic molecules and such heterostructures might be used in applications like high-performance detectors, solar cells and flexible transistors to name but a few.

 

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